Racism

Hillary Clinton on Friday defended her 2016 campaign strategy after 2020 Democratic presidential contender Pete Buttigieg criticized his party’s previous nominee for being too hopeful and not understanding the struggles of everyday Americans.

“I really do believe that we always have to appeal to our better selves because the wolf is at the door, my friends,” Clinton said during an appearance at the 10th Annual Women in the World New York Summit. “Negativity, despair, anxiety, resentment, anger, prejudice, that’s part of human nature and the job of the leader is to appeal to us to be more than we can be on our own, to join hands in common effort.”

“I was well aware that we had problems that we had to solve, but it’s been my experience that anger, resent, prejudice are not strategies,” the former first lady, secretary of state and senator from New York added. “They stop people from thinking. They don’t enlist people in the common effort to try to find solutions.”

Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind., told the Washington Post in a profile published January that President Trump connected with the concerns of ordinary Americans in a way Clinton did not.

“Donald Trump got elected because, in his twisted way, he pointed out the huge troubles in our economy and our democracy,” he said. “At least he didn’t go around saying that America was already great, like Hillary did.”

A senior Clinton adviser blasted Buttigieg’s comments last month via Twitter as “indefensible.”

“[Hillary Clinton] ran on a belief in this country & the most progressive platform in modern political history. Trump ran on pessimism, racism, false promises, & vitriol. Interpret that how you want, but there are 66,000,000 people who disagree. Good luck,” Nick Merrill tweeted.

“It’s pretty simple. Slam HRC…lose my vote,” and another who chimed in: “It is unfortunate when people as smart as @PeteButtigieg engage in this fantasy fiction about 2016. And as a gay American it is disappointing because @HillaryClinton ran a campaign which amongst its many values championed our community,” Merrill also wrote.

Novelist Bret Easton Ellis has lamented “hysteria” over President Trump and described Michelle Obama’s comment that “when they go low, we go high” as “breathlessly condescending”.

“The hysteria over Trump is what I am talking about. It’s not about his policies or supposed racism. It’s about what I see as an overreaction to Trump,” Ellis said in an interview with the New Yorker. He said: “It’s not just the left. There seems to have been this hysterical overreaction that can be solved with voting him out of office.”

Ellis was talking about new book White, in which the Michelle Obama comment appears.

The author, who rose to prominence with Less than Zero, American Psycho, and The Rules of Attraction, was asked about the outrage over Trump calling Mexicans criminals and rapists. Ellis said he was more “bothered by people using that one thing two years later” in discourse surrounding the president.

“I was forced to care based on how it was covered and how people have reacted. Sure, you can be hysterical, or you can wait and vote him out of office,” Ellis said.

“They might very well vote him out. I hope they do, so we have some sense of normalcy in this household,” Ellis said referring to his live-in boyfriend, who he describes as a “Democratic, socialist-bordering-on-communist millennial.”


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